Protecting Your Manufactured Home Against Termites

When my youngest child moved out, I was left living in a large home by myself. Weekend visits from the grandchildren only filled the space part of the time. The home became more of a burden as each day passed. It was not until I was working with my real estate agent to sell my home and find a smaller home did I realize that there were so many others in the same position. I created this blog to help other empty nesters explore their options for downsizing and to provide guidance on finding a new home that fits in more with their lifestyle.

Protecting Your Manufactured Home Against Termites

Protecting Your Manufactured Home Against Termites

18 February 2015
 Categories:
, Blog


Manufactured and mobile homes aren't immune to termite infestations. Although the home may have a steel framework at the base and doesn't sit directly on the ground, termites can still get in and cause irreparable damage. A combination of preventative techniques and prompt treatment of any pests can save your home from these pests.

How they Get In

Termites aren't limited to just the ground and to wood. They can climb up the concrete piers or wooden supports that make up the foundation of your manufactured home. Skirting, whether it's wood, fiberglass, or vinyl, can also provide an easy access point to the wood above. Once they gain access, they usually begin feeding on the cellulose wood fibers that make up the home's floors and basic framework.

Spring is the typical time for a new infestation to start. This is when the termites swarm. They may also attack the exterior wood on the home, such as the siding or roof eaves. They only need to find access in one location to get a foothold in the home.

Prevention

The best prevention is to ensure that the bottom of your home is secured. Most mobile homes have a vapor barrier on the bottom. Not only does this keep out moisture and drafts, it also creates a barrier against termites. Inspect the bottom of your home from the crawl space, and make sure the vapor barrier is in good condition with no tears or leaks.

Treating anything that reaches from the ground into your home, such as plumbing pipes, piers or electrical wires, with a termite-specific pesticide, will also prevent them from traveling into your house. The ground is also often treated with a long-lasting pesticide. These pre-treatment pesticides are sometimes called termite barriers. They can be applied to both wood and non-wood surfaces to crate an effective barrier against feeding termites.

Treatment

If you already have termites, a quick appointment with a pest control company is necessary. Signs of an infestation include hollow or disintegrating wood on the home, the presence of mud tunnels on the wood surfaces, piles of dry wood dust, or crackling paint. You may also see the actual insects, alive or dead, inside or just outside the home.

Treatment methods range from tenting, which seals the home while the pesticide does its job, to injection, which requires small holes in the wall for the pesticide to be "injected" into the infested area. After treatment, it's imperative that preventative measures are taken to create a barrier against any future pests. Talk to experts like Fowler Pest Control for more information.

About Me
Home Buying Tips for Empty Nesters

When my youngest child moved out, I was left living in a large home by myself. Weekend visits from the grandchildren only filled the space part of the time. The home became more of a burden as each day passed. It was not until I was working with my real estate agent to sell my home and find a smaller home did I realize that there were so many others in the same position. I created this blog to help other empty nesters explore their options for downsizing and to provide guidance on finding a new home that fits in more with their lifestyle.

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